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The Most Enlightenment Immanuel Kant Quotes

Last updated on Apr 22nd, 2017
The Most Enlightenment Immanuel Kant Quotes

Immanuel Kant (born April 22, 1724, Königsberg, Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia) – died February 12, 1804, Königsberg) was a German philosopher and one of the foremost thinkers of the Enlightenment era.

His works and beliefs, especially those on epistemology, metaphysics, political theory, ethics, and aesthetics had a significant influence on subsequent philosophers and contemporary philosophy.

Kant’s major works include the Critique of Pure Reason (Kritik der reinen Vernunft, 1781), the Critique of Practical Reason (Kritik der praktischen Vernunft, 1788), the Metaphysics of Morals (Die Metaphysik der Sitten, 1797), and the Critique of Judgment (Kritik der Urteilskraft, 1790).

He is often considered a central figure in modern philosophy.

1
Thoughts without contents are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind.Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
2
Nothing straight can be constructed from such warped wood as that which man is made of.Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)
3
Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination.Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785)
4
Morality is not properly the doctrine how we should make ourselves happy, but how we should become worthy of happiness.Critique of Practical Reason (1788)
5
Enlightenment is man’s leaving his self-caused immaturity. Immaturity is the incapacity to use one’s intelligence without the guidance of another.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)
6
Freedom is the alone unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity.The Metaphysic of Ethics, Translated by John William Semple, Edinburgh: Thomas Clark, 1836
7
All our knowledge is contained within this whole of possible experience.Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
8
Laziness and cowardice are the reasons why such a large proportion of men, even when nature has long emancipated them from alien guidance, nevertheless gladly remain immature for life.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)
9
Man is an animal who needs a master.Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)
10
The senses do not err, not because they always judge correctly, but because they do not judge at all.Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
11
Morality then is the relation of actions to the autonomy of the will, that is, to the potential universal legislation by its maxims.Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785)
12
For enlightenment of this kind, all that is needed is freedom. And the freedom in question is the most innocuous form of all-freedom to make public use of one’s reason in all matters.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)
13
But although all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it arises from experience.Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
14
All good enterprises which are not grafted on to a morally good attitude of mind are nothing but illusion and outwardly glittering misery.Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)
15
Act only on that maxim whereby thou canst at the same time will that it should become a universal law.Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785)
16
I have no knowledge of myself as I am, but only as I appear to myself.Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
17
The unsearchable wisdom by which we exist is not less worthy of admiration in what it has denied than in what it has granted.Critique of Practical Reason (1788)
18
The public use of man’s reason must always be free, and it alone can bring about enlightenment among men.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)
19
All the natural capacities of a creature are destined sooner or later to be developed completely and in conformity with their end.Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)
20
I had therefore to remove knowledge, in order to make room for belief.Critique of Pure Reason (1781)
21
It is difficult for each separate individual to work his way out of the immaturity which has become almost second nature to him.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)
22
Reason does not itself work instinctively, for it requires trial, practice and instruction to enable it to progress gradually from one stage of insight to the next.Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)
23
All human knowledge begins with intuitions, advances to concepts, and ends with ideas.Critique of Pure Reason (1781)