The Most Enlightenment Immanuel Kant Quotes

Last updated on Aug 7th, 2020

The Most Enlightenment Immanuel Kant Quotes

Immanuel Kant (born April 22, 1724, Königsberg, Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia) – died February 12, 1804, Königsberg) was a German philosopher and one of the foremost thinkers of the Enlightenment era.

His works and beliefs, especially those on epistemology, metaphysics, political theory, ethics, and aesthetics, had a significant influence on subsequent philosophers and contemporary philosophy.

Kant’s major works include the Critique of Pure Reason (Kritik der reinen Vernunft, 1781), the Critique of Practical Reason (Kritik der praktischen Vernunft, 1788), the Metaphysics of Morals (Die Metaphysik der Sitten, 1797), and the Critique of Judgment (Kritik der Urteilskraft, 1790).

He is often considered a central figure in modern philosophy.

Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason Quotes)
1

Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind.Second Part. Transcendental Logic, Chapter I: Logic in General, Critique of Pure Reason (1781)

Nothing straight can be constructed from such warped wood as that which man is made of. - Immanuel Kant (Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose Quotes)
2

Nothing straight can be constructed from such warped wood as that which man is made of.Sixth Proposition, Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)

Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination. - Immanuel Kant (Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals Quotes)
3

Happiness is not an ideal of reason but of imagination.Second Section. Transition from popular moral philosophy to the metaphysics of morals, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785)

Morality is not properly the doctrine how we should make ourselves happy, but how we should become worthy of happiness. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Practical Reason Quotes)
4

Morality is not properly the doctrine how we should make ourselves happy, but how we should become worthy of happiness.Part I. Elements of Pure Practical Reason, Book II. Dialectic of Pure Practical Reason, Chapter II. Of the Dialectic of Pure Reason in Defining the Conception of the Summum Bonum, Critique of Practical Reason (1788)

Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-incurred immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one understanding without guidance of another. - Immanuel Kant (An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? Quotes)
5

Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his self-incurred immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one understanding without guidance of another.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)

Freedom is Independence of the compulsory Will of another; and in so far as it can co-exist with the Freedom of all according to a universal Law, it is the one sole original, inborn Right belonging to every man in virtue of his Humanity. - Immanuel Kant (The Metaphysics of Morals Quotes)
6

Freedom is Independence of the compulsory Will of another; and in so far as it can co-exist with the Freedom of all according to a universal Law, it is the one sole original, inborn Right belonging to every man in virtue of his Humanity.General Divisions of the Metaphysic of Morals, The Metaphysics of Morals (1797)

All our knowledge is contained within this whole of possible experience. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason Quotes)
7

All our knowledge is contained within this whole of possible experience.Division One. Transcendental Analytic, Book II. Analytic of Principles, Chapter I. On the Schematism of Pure Concepts of the Understanding, Critique of Pure Reason (1781)

Laziness and cowardice are the reasons why so great a portion of mankind, after nature has long since discharged them from external direction (naturaliter maiorennes), nevertheless remains under lifelong tutelage, and why it is so easy for others to set themselves up as their guardians. - Immanuel Kant (An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? Quotes)
8

Laziness and cowardice are the reasons why so great a portion of mankind, after nature has long since discharged them from external direction (naturaliter maiorennes), nevertheless remains under lifelong tutelage, and why it is so easy for others to set themselves up as their guardians.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)

Man is an animal that, so long as he lives amongst others of his species, stands in need of a master. - Immanuel Kant (Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose Quotes)
9

Man is an animal that, so long as he lives amongst others of his species, stands in need of a master.Sixth Proposition, Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)

The senses do not err, not because they always judge correctly, but because they do not judge at all. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason Quotes)
10

The senses do not err, not because they always judge correctly, but because they do not judge at all.Division Two. Transcendental Dialectic, Chapter I. Transcendental Illusion, Critique of Pure Reason (1781)

Morality thus is the relation of actions to the autonomy of the will, that is, to the possible universal legislation through its maxims. - Immanuel Kant (Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals Quotes)
11

Morality thus is the relation of actions to the autonomy of the will, that is, to the possible universal legislation through its maxims.Second Section. Transition from Popular Moral Philosophy to the Metaphysics of Morals, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785)

For enlightenment of this kind, all that is needed is freedom. And the freedom in question is the most innocuous form of all-freedom to make public use of one's reason in all matters. - Immanuel Kant (An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? Quotes)
12

For enlightenment of this kind, all that is needed is freedom. And the freedom in question is the most innocuous form of all-freedom to make public use of one’s reason in all matters.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)

But although all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it arises from experience. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason Quotes)
13

But although all our knowledge begins with experience, it does not follow that it arises from experience.Introduction I. Of the Difference Between Pure and Empirical Knowledge, Critique of Pure Reason (1781)

All good enterprises which are not grafted on to a morally good attitude of mind are nothing but illusion and outwardly glittering misery. - Immanuel Kant (Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose Quotes)
14

All good enterprises which are not grafted on to a morally good attitude of mind are nothing but illusion and outwardly glittering misery.Seventh Proposition, Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)

Act only in accordance with that maxim through which you can at the same time will that it become a universal law. - Immanuel Kant (Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals Quotes)
15

Act only in accordance with that maxim through which you can at the same time will that it become a universal law.Second Section. Transition from Popular Moral Philosophy to the Metaphysics of Morals, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785)

I have no knowledge of myself as I am, but only as I appear to myself. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason Quotes)
16

I have no knowledge of myself as I am, but only as I appear to myself.Division One. Transcendental Analytic, Book I. Analytic of Concepts, Chapter II. On the Deduction of the Pure Concepts of the Understanding, Critique of Pure Reason (1781)

The unsearchable wisdom by which we exist is not less worthy of admiration in what it has denied than in what it has granted. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Practical Reason Quotes)
17

The unsearchable wisdom by which we exist is not less worthy of admiration in what it has denied than in what it has granted.Part I. Book II. Dialectic of Pure Practical Reason, Chapter II. Of the Dialectic of Pure Reason in Defining the Conception of the Summum Bonum, Critique of Practical Reason (1788)

The public use of man's reason must always be free, and it alone can bring about enlightenment among men. - Immanuel Kant (An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? Quotes)
18

The public use of man’s reason must always be free, and it alone can bring about enlightenment among men.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)

All the natural capacities of a creature are destined sooner or later to be developed completely and in conformity with their end. - Immanuel Kant (Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose Quotes)
19

All the natural capacities of a creature are destined sooner or later to be developed completely and in conformity with their end.First Proposition, Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)

I had therefore to remove knowledge, in order to make room for belief. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason Quotes)
20

I had therefore to remove knowledge, in order to make room for belief.Preface to Second Edition, Critique of Pure Reason (1781)

It is difficult for each separate individual to work his way out of the immaturity which has become almost second nature to him. - Immanuel Kant (An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? Quotes)
21

It is difficult for each separate individual to work his way out of the immaturity which has become almost second nature to him.An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)

Reason, in a creature, is a faculty which enables that creature to extend far beyond the limits of natural instinct the rules and intentions it follows in using its various powers, and the range of its projects is unbounded. But reason does not itself work instinctively, for it requires trial, practice and instruction to enable it to progress gradually from one stage of insight to the next. - Immanuel Kant (Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose Quotes)
22

Reason, in a creature, is a faculty which enables that creature to extend far beyond the limits of natural instinct the rules and intentions it follows in using its various powers, and the range of its projects is unbounded. But reason does not itself work instinctively, for it requires trial, practice and instruction to enable it to progress gradually from one stage of insight to the next.Second Proposition, Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)

All human knowledge begins with intuitions, proceeds from thence to concepts, and ends with ideas. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason Quotes)
23

All human knowledge begins with intuitions, proceeds from thence to concepts, and ends with ideas.Division Two. Transcendental Dialectic, Book II. The Dialectical Inferences of Pure Reason Chapter III: The Ideal of Pure Reason, Critique of Pure Reason (1781)

The more a cultivated reason applies itself with deliberate purpose to the enjoyment of life and happiness, so much the more does the man fail of true satisfaction. - Immanuel Kant (Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals Quotes)
24

The more a cultivated reason applies itself with deliberate purpose to the enjoyment of life and happiness, so much the more does the man fail of true satisfaction.First Section. Transition from the Common Rational Knowledge of Morality to the Philosophical, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785)

Man wishes concord, but nature, knowing better what is good for his species, wishes discord. - Immanuel Kant (Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose Quotes)
25

Man wishes concord, but nature, knowing better what is good for his species, wishes discord.Fourth Proposition, Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (1784)

Only the descent into the hell of self-knowledge can pave the way to godliness. - Immanuel Kant (Metaphysics of Morals Quotes)
26

Only the descent into the hell of self-knowledge can pave the way to godliness.The Metaphysical Elements of the Doctrine of Virtue, Metaphysics of Morals (1797)

Laughter is an affect that arises if a tense expectation is transformed into nothing. - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Judgment Quotes)
27

Laughter is an affect that arises if a tense expectation is transformed into nothing.Part I. Critique of Aesthetic Judgement, First Section. Analytic of Aesthetic Judgement, Second Book. Analytic of the Sublime, Critique of Judgment (1790)

However small the object of an injustice may be, the injustice itself may be very great. - Immanuel Kant (Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch Quotes)
28

However small the object of an injustice may be, the injustice itself may be very great.Appendix II, Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch (1795)

By a lie a man throws away and, as it were, annihilates his dignity as a man. - Immanuel Kant (Metaphysics of Morals Quotes)
29

By a lie a man throws away and, as it were, annihilates his dignity as a man.The Metaphysical Elements of the Doctrine of Virtue, Metaphysics of Morals (1797)

Have courage to use your own mind! - Immanuel Kant (An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? Quotes)
30

Have courage to use your own mind!An Answer to the Question: What Is Enlightenment? (1784)