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35 Astute Quotes by Niccoló Machiavelli

Last updated on May 23rd, 2019

35 Astute Quotes by Niccoló Machiavelli

Niccolò Machiavelli (born May 3, 1469, Florence, Italy – died June 21, 1527, Florence, Italy) was an Italian diplomat, philosopher, writer, and an important figure of the Italian Renaissance, known primarily for his political ideas.

Machiavelli is best known as the author of The Prince (1532), a political treatise that inspired the term Machiavellianism and established its author as the father of modern political science. In addition to The Prince, Machiavelli wrote Discourses on Livy (1531), The Art of War (1521), Florentine Histories (1532), and several minor compositions, including The Mandrake (1524).

Often misinterpreted, Machiavelli’s philosophical legacy remains enigmatic, but his influence has been enormous. His works and ideas have strongly influenced figures such as Francis Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Baruch Spinoza, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, Denis Diderot, and many others.

1
The first impression that one gets of a ruler and of his brains is from seeing the men that he has about him.'Chapter XXII,' The Prince (1532)
2
If one wishes to be obeyed, it is necessary to know how to command.'Third Book: Chapter XXII' Discourses on Livy (1531)
3
It is not titles that honor men, but men honor the titles.'Third Book: Chapter XXXVII' Discourses on Livy (1531)
4
The lion cannot protect himself from snares, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. One must therefore be a fox to recognise snares, and a lion to frighten wolves.'Chapter XVIII' The Prince (1532)
Everybody sees what you appear to be, few feel what you are. - Niccoló Machiavelli (The Prince Quotes)
5
Everybody sees what you appear to be, few feel what you are.'Chapter XVIII' The Prince (1532)
6
Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.'Third Book: Chapter IX' Discourses on Livy (1531)
7
War was not to be avoided, and could be deferred only to the advantage of the other side.'Chapter III' The Prince (1532)
8
No enterprise is more likely to succeed than one concealed from the enemy until it is ripe for execution.'Book Seven' The Art of War (1921)
9
There is no other way of guarding one’s self against flattery than by letting men understand that they will not offend you by speaking the truth.'Chapter XXIII' The Prince (1532)
It is much safer to be feared than loved, if one of the two has to be wanting. - Niccoló Machiavelli (The Prince Quotes)
10
It is much safer to be feared than loved, if one of the two has to be wanting.'Chapter XVII' The Prince (1532)
11
There is nothing more difficult to carry out, nor more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to handle, than to initiate a new order of things.'Chapter VI' The Prince (1532)
12
Hatred is gained as much by good works as by evil.'Chapter XIX' The Prince (1532)
13
Men are driven chiefly by two things: love and fear.'Third Book: Chapter XXI' Discourses on Livy (1531)
14
All armed prophets have conquered and unarmed ones failed.'Chapter VI' The Prince (1532)
The injury therefore that we do to a man must be such that we need not fear his vengeance. - Niccoló Machiavelli (The Prince Quotes)
15
The injury therefore that we do to a man must be such that we need not fear his vengeance.'Chapter III' The Prince (1532)
16
He who neglects what is done for what ought to be done, sooner effects his ruin than his preservation.'Chapter XV' The Prince (1532)
17
When neither their property nor their honor is touched, the majority of men live content.'Chapter XIX' The Prince (1532)
18
In all human affairs, we cannot rid ourselves of one inconvenience without running into another.'First Book: Chapter VI,' Discourses on Livy (1531)
19
Like all other things which are horn and grow rapidly, cannot have deep roots, so that the first storm destroys them.'Chapter VII' The Prince (1532)
Where the willingness is great the difficulties cannot be great. - Niccoló Machiavelli (The Prince Quotes)
20
Where the willingness is great the difficulties cannot be great.'Chapter XXVI' The Prince (1532)
21
Nothing is of greater importance in time of war than in knowing how to make the best use of a fair opportunity when it is offered.'Book Seven' The Art of War (1521)
22
Whoever desires to found a state and give it laws, must start with assuming that all men are bad and ever ready to display their vicious nature, whenever they may find occasion for it.'First Book: Chapter III' Discourses on Livy (1531)
23
Benefits should be granted little by little, so that they may be better enjoyed.'Chapter VIII' The Prince (1532)
24
We cannot attribute to fortune or merit that which he achieved without either.'Chapter VIII' The Prince (1532)
One who deceives will always find those who allow themselves to be deceived. - Niccoló Machiavelli (The Prince Quotes)
25
One who deceives will always find those who allow themselves to be deceived.'Chapter XVIII' The Prince (1532)
26
A prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest.'Chapter XVIII' The Prince (1532)
27
Few men are brave by nature, but good discipline and experience make many so. Good order and discipline in an army are more to be depended upon than ferocity.'Book Seven' The Art of War (1921)
28
A prudent man should always follow in the path trodden by great men and imitate those who are most excellent, so that if he does not attain to their greatness, at any rate he will get some tinge of it.'Chapter VI' The Prince (1532)
29
Whoever considers the past and the present will readily observe that all cities and all peoples are and ever have been animated by the same desires and the same passions.'First Book: Chapter XXXIX' Discourses on Livy (1531)
Men rise from one ambition to another: first, they seek to secure themselves against attack, and then they attack others. - Niccoló Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy Quotes)
30
Men rise from one ambition to another: first, they seek to secure themselves against attack, and then they attack others.'First Book: Chapter XLVI' Discourses on Livy (1531)
31
There are three different kinds of brains, the one understands things unassisted, the other understands things when shown by others, the third understands neither alone nor with the explanations of others. The first kind is most excellent, the second also excellent, but the third useless.'Chapter XXII' The Prince (1532)
32
The chief foundations of all states, whether new, old, or mixed, are good laws and good arms. And as there cannot be good laws where there are not good arms, and where there are good arms there should be good laws.'Chapter XII' The Prince (1532)
33
A man who wishes to make a profession of goodness in everything must necessarily come to grief among so many who are not good.'Chapter XV' The Prince (1532)
34
Men have less scruple in offending one who makes himself loved than one who makes himself feared.'Chapter XVII' The Prince (1532)
One change always leaves the way prepared for the introduction of another. - Niccoló Machiavelli (The Prince Quotes)
35
One change always leaves the way prepared for the introduction of another.'Chapter II' The Prince (1532)

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